Monthly Archives: July 2006

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For you Pulp Fiction loving, Republican hating folks out there, here’s a great parody that answers the question of what really happened with Dick Cheney and Harry Whittington and that infamous shooting incident.

The preferred mode of travel in Delhi is the ubiquitous autorickshaw. These are little more than scooters with a small passenger compartment attached to the back. Because of the free-for-all driving in Delhi, these little guys can zip through traffic faster than conventional taxis. In fact, there are parts of old Delhi where the streets are so narrow that these and the even less automated pedal rickshaws are the only ways to get around.

Taxi?Taxi?Hosted on Zooomr

I just got back from India on Friday after the longest time I’ve ever spent in an airplane in one sitting (16 hrs from Delhi to Chicago!). India is a fascinating place. There is, of course, lots of poverty – I think I was told that the average income is something like a dollar a day – but it’s not reflected in the people like it is in other countries. The people are, in general, happy and helpful (even more helpful if a tip might be involved) and while they live in what we might consider squalid conditions, there is a palpable sense of community even in these shack ghettos.

And then there is technology. The mobile market is through the roof there which, for the second most populous country on the planet, really means something. Broadband has a ways to go (256kbps is the fastest speed!), but is approaching the hockey stick ramp up. There are new roads going in, fancy new corporate offices, Delhi has a brand new underground Metro train system – infrastructure is being developed all over the country. It takes a long time to construct there because of simple (some would say primitive) construction methods – you still see bamboo scaffolding and they move concrete by having women carry it in baskets on their heads. Heck, I saw three guys on their hands and knees cutting a rather large lawn with hedge clippers. Of course, their philosophy is why invest in equipment if labor is cheap and plentiful – they would rather have the country employed before they start looking for efficiencies.
I didn’t make it to Agra and the Taj Mahal like I had hoped, and my camera lens kept fogging up as I went from the air conditioned car to the 100 degree humidity, but I still got off a few good shots that I’ll post shortly.